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Legal Business Development: What To Do With The Leads You Acquire At A Conference

I worked with a client the other day to figure out what strategy she should put into place to maximize the 60 business cards she picked up during a 2-day conference that was truly filled with people who are her target market. First and foremost, it’s about building relationships, so where do we begin?

The first “touch” needs to be a very personal email, referring to the interaction at the conference. This presented a problem for my client since she couldn’t remember something specific about each of the 60 individuals she met. It’s not unusual...60 people are too many unless all you are going to do is turn the names and emails over to your marketing department to add to your data base. And the probability of turning those people into clients is slim to none.

There is another way. Since the attendees of this conference are her target market, she needs to make sure these 60 individuals do not slip through her fingers. Hence, it will take a bit of time but could have great rewards if done right.

  1. Do research on each person. When she sees their photo, it may jar her memory or she will find something in the bio that will be relevant.
  2. Sort them into A, B and C possibilities. A being the hot leads.

 

  1. The A’s need to be sent with the VERY personal message. And include something you are giving them. A piece of information or some gesture that would be valued. You need to give something before you ask for something.
  2. Repetition, repetition, repetition! It’s important that you schedule your future touch points, at least 3 for this “after conference follow up.” So, “touches” number 2 and 3 need to be planned out. All three should happen within 2 weeks of the conference.
  3. On-going follow-up. A’s could be once a month, B’s could be once a quarter and C’s twice a year. Each time, refer to something that happened at the conference or some personal conversation.

The idea with the “A” leads is to stay top-of-mind. With B’s and C’s, it is to move them up the chain. Think of reasons to get together. A football game, a concert, etc.

Remember that generally people don’t have work just waiting for the right attorney. They find YOU and then it’s a matter of time...when you will be thought of...for work. Building the relationship is the name of this game...play it well, my friend!

Paula Black

Drawing on over twenty years' experience in branding and positioning, Paula Black has advised law firms around the globe on everything from powerful and innovative design to marketing strategy and business growth. She is the award-winning author of "The Little Black Book on Law Firm Branding & Positioning," "The Little Black Book on Law Firm Marketing and Business Development," and "The Little Black Book: A Lawyer's Guide To Creating A Marketing Habit in 21 Days," as well as founder and President of Miami-based Paula Black & Associates. For more information visit http://www.paulablacklegalmarketing.com

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Filed Under: Featured StoriesMarketing

About the Author: Drawing on over twenty years' experience in branding and positioning, Paula Black has advised law firms around the globe on everything from powerful and innovative design to marketing strategy and business growth. She is the award-winning author of "The Little Black Book on Law Firm Branding & Positioning," "The Little Black Book on Law Firm Marketing and Business Development," and "The Little Black Book: A Lawyer's Guide To Creating A Marketing Habit in 21 Days," as well as founder and President of Miami-based Paula Black & Associates. For more information visit http://www.paulablacklegalmarketing.com

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