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Identifying and Grooming High-Potential Employees

How do you identify high-potential new leaders? Leaders must be proficient in both hard and soft skills. For years, organizations looked at only hard skills or technical knowledge, such as expertise in strategy or finance. They viewed these hard skills as the most important characteristics of highpotential leaders. However, the soft skills (people or interpersonal skills) are key for the next generation of leaders.

Look for these soft skills: effective communication, coaching ability, listening skills, team building capability, facility for building relationships with their staffs and teams and with crossfunctional areas to achieve goals and get work done; a sense of inquisitiveness, a willingness to improve, a tendency to ask a lot of questions, and an understanding of how their actions affect themselves and others.
Leadership is difficult and demanding because leaders must help drive results, inspire, guide people and teams, and make tough decisions. Clearly, not everyone has the desire to lead, so the first question appears to be: Does the person want to be a leader? What are his or her goals and aspirations? Does he or she see the big picture versus having a silo mentality? Is the candidate a problem-solver? Does the candidate have the ability to strategically navigate complicated issues? What types of real life experiences does he or she have? Is the candidate honest and ethical?

Leaders need to be positive and have a great attitude because they can either impart or sap energy. A leader’s upbeat attitude becomes contagious, lifting the morale of those around him or her. You can always teach skills, but you cannot always teach people how to be positive; they either have a great attitude or they don’t. Observe first-hand how potential leaders work with others and how other people view them. When they stand up to speak in front of a group, do they exude confidence, present articulate, clear messages, and carry themselves well? They should also have good judgment skills in three discrete areas:

1. People. Can they make sound judgments about people, such as anticipating the need for key personnel changes and aligning people to make the right call?
2. Strategy. Are they flexible and adaptable? Can they make changes when a current strategy isn’t working?
3. Grace under pressure. When they’re in crisis situations, do they remain calm, focused on their goals, think clearly, and develop new alternative strategies? When they make a mistake, do they admit it, let others know about it, and move forward, or do they try to hide it? By admitting mistakes, they serve as role models, communicating that it’s okay to fail and make a mistake.

Excerpted with permission of the publisher, Wiley, from Seven Disciplines of A Leader by Jeff Wolf. Copyright © 2015 by Jeff Wolf.All rights reserved. This book is available at all bookstores and online booksellers.

Jeff Wolf

Jeff Wolf is one of America’s foremost executive business coaches, speakers and management consultants. In December 2010, prestigious Leadership Excellence Magazine named him one of the Top 100 Thought Leaders for his accomplishments in leadership development, managerial effectiveness and organizational productivity. His strategic focus on solving corporate and human issues has garnered continuing raves from myriad global organizations. Jeff can be reached at: (858) 638-8260 and jeff@wolfmotivation.com.

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Filed Under: Featured StoriesPersonal Development

About the Author: Jeff Wolf is one of America’s foremost executive business coaches, speakers and management consultants. In December 2010, prestigious Leadership Excellence Magazine named him one of the Top 100 Thought Leaders for his accomplishments in leadership development, managerial effectiveness and organizational productivity. His strategic focus on solving corporate and human issues has garnered continuing raves from myriad global organizations. Jeff can be reached at: (858) 638-8260 and jeff@wolfmotivation.com.

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