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Attorney Spotlight: Norman M. Finkelstein

Before Norman M. Finkelstein, founder of the Law Offices of Norman M. Finkelstein, APC, spent his days vigorously fighting for justice for victims and families of elder abuse and medical malpractice, he was on a very different side of the law. “I was a police lieutenant in New York City, and tried many narcotics cases. I found that I enjoyed the back and forth during cross examination, and decided to go to law school,” he recalls.
After graduating from New York Law School in 1983, the AV-Preeminent-rated attorney made his way to America’s Finest City, and soon after opened his firm. A pioneer in the field of medical malpractice, Finkelstein initially chose to focus his efforts in the practice area, as the result of demand and a sincere desire to help. “People who were victims of medical malpractice needed a competent attorney to represent them, since there were only a few firms in the county who were helping these types of victims,” he says.
Not long after, he also expanded his focus to include elder abuse, and has delivered outstanding results for clients for more than 20 years. Not surprisingly, with such vast experience, Finkelstein has earned a reputation as a straight shooter, who is more than happy to go to trial to obtain justice for victims of medical malpractice, elder abuse or elder neglect in California nursing homes.
“I treat every case as if it was going to be tried. Working a case up for trial is the way to learn the nuances of each case, which is extremely helpful in obtaining good settlements,” he says. However, as the defense bar and insurance companies know all too well, Finkelstein will absolutely take cases to trial if a valuable settlement cannot be reached. “I am very compassionate towards my clients and have empathy for their situations. My experience in law enforcement certainly gave me tools that are incredibly useful in seeking evidence necessary to prosecute a claim,” he adds. Moreover, as a longtime, highly regarded San Diego attorney, suffice it to say, Finkelstein has the financial resources to try costly and challenging cases.
In fact, at this juncture of his esteemed career, Finkelstein finds himself in a bit of a sweet-spot. Though he helmed a larger firm for years, these days, he has no desire to grow his firm. Admitting that he is selective about the cases he takes, Finkelstein, who counts numerous published decisions amongst his successes, limits his caseload to 10-15 cases each year. The reason is simple: it allows him to devote his full attention to each and every client he represents. He’s also found the smaller caseload to be instrumental in achieving a greater work-life balance, allowing for more time spent with family and far less stress than in years past.
As for the future, Finkelstein intends to stay the course, as a solo practitioner, all the while enjoying the fruits of his labor over the past 34 year, which he credits to those who have trusted him to represent them in their darkest hour. “l believe that an attorney’s success really is dependent upon the clients he or she represents, and his or her support staff. My success would not have been possible without wonderful clients and a great support staff over the years.”

“I believe that an attorney’s success really is dependent on the clients he or she represents, and his or her support staff.”

Karen Gorden

Karen Gorden is a Staff Writer for Attorney Journal.

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Filed Under: Featured StoriesPersonal Development

About the Author: Karen Gorden is a Staff Writer for Attorney Journal.

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